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building compliance vs complaints

By Jackie Berens

Building Compliance vs Building Complaints (not just a spelling error)

Building Compliance vs Building Complaints (not just a spelling error)

There’s a good reason for the codes and standards established by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  Compliance isn’t a punishment, it’s a roadmap to safety, protection, and long term sustainability. Building Compliance vs Building Complaints (not just a spelling error)– it doesn’t have to be so overwhelming. 

With over 300 codes written in “legal-ese”, it’s not always as intuitive as it should be to comply with fire safety codes so we’ve created a cheat sheet to steer you in the right direction. 

300 Fire Protection Compliance Codes?!?

The likelihood is that your building does not have to comply with all 300 NFPA codes and standards. Searching the NFPA’s database can simplify the process: https://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/all-codes-and-standards/list-of-codes-and-standards

There are codes you’ll regularly encounter such as 

NFPA 99 Health Care Facilities Code

And 

NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code®

And others that are very specific such as: 

NFPA 418 Standard for Heliports

Compliance isn’t the goal, safety is the goal, and – in that vein – we always recommend the following precautions be taken: 

Dispose of excess packaging in real-time.  Piles of boxes can fuel a fire that might otherwise be easily managed. 

Oily rags can spontaneously combust, it seems like the stuff of action moves, and yet, it happens all the time.  Rag disposal is essential to safety. 

Don’t put a lantern in the shed with the cow. 

Check your fire extinguishers.  An expired extinguisher is not only frustrating, it can be deadly. 

A popping sound when you turn on the light is a warning!  Inspect electric lines that are old or unreliable. 

Refine your disaster preparedness plan for fire, earthquake, flood, locusts, and any other eventuality.

Make sure everyone knows what to do, who is in charge, how to get out, and where to go once they get out. 

Bring in the experts at VFS.  We’ve seen it all. 

Our teams can ensure compliance and ensure that compliance isn’t all you’re doing to prevent fires. We are a full fire and life safety contractor and after-market service provider. Whether your needs are related to fire sprinkler systems, alarms systems, extinguishers, backflows, fire pumps, suppression, special hazards, monitoring, DAS systems, emergency notification (the list goes on and on) we can not only inspect and maintain those systems but we also design, build and install! With our inspections program, we manage, schedule, and track your inspections, deficiencies, and repairs so you don’t have to. 

At VFS we pride ourselves on the caliber of our team members, our commitment to a holistic understanding of your needs, and our sommelier level wine collection (get to know our founder).  We are the team you want to bring on to your project.  Connect with us, take a look inside.

hurricane and fire season

By Jackie Berens

It’s hurricane and fire season, is your alarm monitoring system reliable?

It all began with the global pandemic, and then the wildfires started, and on top of that hurricanes roaring through the Southeast, I mean what else can go wrong? R.E.M cannot be right, this is not the end of the world as we know it! Is your alarm monitoring system reliable to take on these hazards?

With all of these uncontrollable disasters taking place, it reminds us how important it is to invest in the health and safety of our organizations. Are your alarm monitoring systems ready to take on whatever comes their way? If they’re mesh, they are! 

As you think of ways to keep your business safe from harm during unforeseen natural disasters, consider your alarm monitoring system. There are a couple of options when it comes to deciding what system you want to invest in, here’s a breakdown of what each of them offers.

What is a mesh network system? And how does it work?

Wireless mesh networks are a collection of wireless routers that provide network access to clients in commercial buildings. These mesh routers serve as a gateway to the central monitoring station. 

Mesh networks are perfect for any change in the environment, like a hurricane, or fire, as they are able to choose from multiple paths to get information to the end destination. These networks are able to self-heal in case of a node or link failure. When one router becomes compromised, traffic redirects onto an alternative path.

This network is the Michael Jordan of the alarm monitoring systems. With mesh networks, there is no single point of failure. If a router goes down, it reroutes to another. If a gateway goes down, it reroutes to another. A frustrating opponent, but indispensable when on your team. 

Not only is a mesh network extremely reliable, but it is also quite a bit faster than cellular. Mesh radio networks provide a transmission time of only 1-3 seconds, while other networks may take up to 45 seconds. With alarm monitoring systems, every second counts, so be sure your system is prepared to transmit information as quickly as possible.

What about cellular networks? Why is mesh better? 

Cellular systems use local cellular service to relay fire alarm signals from the building to the nearest cell tower. The signal is then relayed to an internet gateway by point-to-point microwaves or fiber optic cables. Once it is on the internet, it is routed to the central monitoring station. 

As far as reliability is concerned, cellular networks do have a single point of failure, which may cause issues. If any part of the communication systems goes down, the communication link is broken.

Is your alarm monitoring system reliable?

Mesh networks are the future of alarm monitoring systems. You don’t want to be ‘that guy’ with the out of style alarm system, stay trendy, stay prepared, stay safe. Contact MeshWrx today!

building compliance vs complaints
Building Compliance vs Building Complaints (not just a spelling error)
hurricane and fire season
It’s hurricane and fire season, is your alarm monitoring system reliable?