Tag Archive for: fire

use the warm summer months while students are on vacation to fire proof campus buildings

(While the kids are away, you should probably fire-proof the Sigma Chi house)

 

You survived another semester! Congratulations! While college students return home for the summer, best practice is to go through and fireproof your buildings… especially the Sigma Chi house (they love lighting up… candles, of course).

 

After all, in just a few short months, students will be back in full force. They may get a break for the warm summer months, but your fire safety procedures never take a vacation. 

Campus Fire Safety

Based on research from the National Fire Protection Association, campus fires peak between September and October– especially between 5-9 pm. 

 

“U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated annual average of 3,840 structure fires in dormitories, fraternities, sororities, and other related properties. These fires caused annual averages of 29 civilian injuries and $11 million in direct property damage.”

 

In order to protect your building and your students from these worrisome statistics, you must ensure your fire safety systems are up-to-date and you should regularly conduct proper fire safety training for both students and faculty. 

Fire Proofing Campus Buildings

So, how does one fireproof an education facility? Most education facilities abide by NFPA Code 101 which “addresses minimum building design, construction, operation, and maintenance requirements necessary to protect building occupants from danger caused by fire, smoke, and toxic fumes.”

 

A few ways you can fireproof your campus buildings are:

 

  • Determining space requirements and maximum occupancy for each room. Hint- to remain compliant with NFPA 101, each person requires at least 20 square feet of space
  • Prepare and update fire evacuation plans
  • Plan fire drills
  • Establish communication with your local jurisdiction and fire authority, and implement their guidelines 
  • Ensure exit areas, stairwells, etc are unobstructed and clear
  • Inspect fire safety equipment to make sure it’s working and updated (i.e. fire alarms, fire sprinkler systems, and fire extinguishers)

What are the Main Causes of Campus Fires?

Fires can break out in multiple ways, however, here are the top five causes of campus-related fires according to data gathered by the U.S. Fire Administration: 

 

  1. Cooking on hot plates, microwaves, portables grills, etc. 
  2. Careless smoking 
  3. Unattended candles 
  4. Overloaded extension cords and outlets

More on how to communicate fire safety with students below. 

Communicating Fire Safety 

Keeping students and faculty educated on fire safety on campus is essential to protecting your people in the event of a fire. Before they step on campus for the semester, send them a pamphlet with fire safety information. This can include:

  • Fire evacuation plans 
  • How to prevent fires
  • How to properly notify the fire department if a fire breaks out 

 

Once students arrive on campus:

  • Review evacuation procedures
  • Show them where the nearest fire extinguishers are located
  • Conduct fire drills
  • Deter tampering with smoke alarms or sprinklers
  • Ensure your RAs are regularly inspecting rooms for fire hazards

 

Remind students that the most common fire causes of campus fires are 

 

  • Check for cigarette buts after parties in chairs, sofas, couches, etc.
  • Use deep, wide ashtrays 
  • Don’t smoke indoors

cooking, candles, smoking, and

fire prep your campus's buildings this summer

 overused power strips. 

Cooking Reminders

  • Keep kitchens clean and clear of flammable materials
  • If cooking– don’t leave the kitchen unattended
  • Only cook in designated areas

Candle Reminders 

  • Do not leave lit candles unattended 
  • Keep candles away from flammable materials

Smoking Reminders

Electrical Safety 

  • Keep light fixtures away from flammable materials
  • Do not plug large appliances into an extension cord 
  • Do not overload outlets or power strips

A Final Word

The perfect time to review your campus facility’s fire safety is during the summer, when fewer students are on campus. For more tips on how to use summer vacation to get your fire safety up to par, read our article here.

 

Tragic marine fires caused by cargo ships, while rare, have caused environmental damage, supply damage, and death to crew members.

There’s a reason why you don’t hear about fires in the middle of the ocean–it’s because they’re rare. We mean, marine and fire aren’t two words that are normally used in the same sentence. But here we are.

 

Marine fires on ships, when they do happen, are typically sparked by:

 

  • Oily rags
  • Electrical fault
  • Human error
  • Engine room leaks

 

Even though over 6,000 container ships sail the ocean every day, marine fire accidents aren’t very common. When they do occur, however, the results can be disastrous.

 

This week, we’re diving into the most infamous marine fires caused by containerships, plus how you can use boater safety tips to help keep your boat afloat. (*Wink* See what we did there?)

 

1. Hanjin Pennsylvania – Indian Ocean, 2002

 

On November 11, 2002, a cargo container on a cargo ship‚ The Hanjin Pennsylvania, exploded off of the coast of Sri Lanka. The ship was transporting goods from Singapore to Germany.

 

The source of the explosion? Misdeclared containers aboard the vessels which stored fireworks. Four days after the initial blast, a second explosion rocked the over 200,000-ton boat.

The ship stayed afloat, but was declared a total loss until it was rebuilt and returned to working condition, then renamed the Norasia Bellatrix.

 

Tragically, two crew members were killed in the accident.

Hanjin Pennsylvania – Indian Ocean, 2002

 

 

2. Hyundai Fortune – Gulf of Aden, 2006

The Hyundai Fortune was carrying over 3,000 shipping containers when it was rocked by an explosion as it headed west in the Gulf of Aden. On March 21, 2006, an explosion launched containers overboard, sent debris five miles past the ship, and damaged ⅓ of the containers aboard.

 

To this day, the cause of the explosion is unknown. The damage to the ship was repaired and later returned to working condition.

 

Only one of the 27 crew members suffered non-life threatening injuries.

 

Hyundai Fortune – Gulf of Aden, 2006

3. MSC Flaminia – North Atlantic, 2012

On a sunny day in July 2012, the German-flagged container ship the MSC was sailing across the North Atlantic when tragedy struck. This 12-year-old vessel  experienced a series of explosions and a major fire aboard during its journey from the U.S. to Belgium. 

 

Tragically, four crew members lost their lives.

 

The 300-meter vessel burned for several weeks and severely damaged the vessel while also spouting toxic smoke into the air. The ship was not allowed refuge for months because it was deemed an environmental hazard.

 

Following the explosion, there was an uproar in the international maritime sector for a call to more action regarding maritime safety as well as new European Union guidelines for ships in distress.

 

Despite the immense damage the ship underwent, it was eventually repaired and returned to service the next year.

The Worst Marine Fires... In Water…

4. Maersk Honam – Arabian Sea, 2018

A few short years ago, the Maersk Honam was headed west of the Arabian Sea carrying over 7,000 containers to Egypt. This vessel, one of the largest of its kind, was deemed an Ultra Large Container Ship (ULCS).

 

When it caught fire on March 6, 2018, the flames were so fierce that after a week, the entire ship from bow to superstructure was ablaze. In fact, the flames were so large that they could be seen from outer space.

 

Five crew members died in the incident and the source of the fire is still unknown due to the heavy damage.

 

Maersk Honam – Arabian Sea, 2018

Marine Fire Safety Tips

When it comes to fire protection, it’s always better to be safe than sorry. Don’t let the tragic incidents of the cargo ships happen to you and your crew! Here are a few tips to stay safe while at sea.

 

  1. Have the proper documents and certifications up to code
  2. Test and check all fire safety equipment
  3. Perform routine engine room maintenance 
  4. Perform routine deck maintenance 
  5. Prepare your crew for emergency situations
  6. Routinely check emergency equipment 

 

For more marine fire safety tips, read our article on boater safety: tips that will float your boat.

 

marine fires cause serious damage

 

All photos courtesy of gCaptain.com.

ajh keeps your buildings safe

As Paul Blart says, “Safety never takes a holiday.” And your facility’s Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) abides by that same standard.  This organization is designed to enforce the NFPA standards and codes on your building. Their mission is to keep both you and your building safe from harm and ensure all of your systems are up to code in case an emergency occurs. 

 

via GIPHY

Let’s dive into what the AHJ is, and why they’re important. 

What is AHJ?

 

AHJ stands for authority having jurisdiction. It’s not a singular entity, rather, it is the authority having jurisdiction for whoever visits the premises to inspect your fire, life and electrical safety programs to meet code standards. 

 

This could be:

 

  • A fire marshal
  • Fire Chief 
  • Labor department 
  • Building official 
  • And more

 

According to the NFPA, AHJ includes, “an organization, office, or individual responsible for enforcing the requirements of a code or standard, or for approving equipment, materials, and installation or a procedure.” 

 

Members of AHJ can come from various places, including federal or state government or private sectors. They are a collective force rather than a specific person. Among this group, you’ll see:

 

  • Fire chief
  • Fire marshal
  • Chief of a fire prevention bureau
  • Labor department member
  • Health department member
  • Building official
  • Electrical inspector
  • Insurance company representative
  • Others having statutory authority

Why Should you Proactively Work With AHJ?

Proactivity is always beneficial when thwarting fire damage. By working with your AHJ before a fire occurs, you increase the odds of protecting your building and, more importantly, your people during an emergency. 

 

If you’re in the beginning stages of building or renovating your commercial property, consulting an AHJ can help ensure all your systems are meeting strict code regulations. This prevents potential fines and issues with compliance that might arise if you are found not up to code.

 

These fire safety codes and standards are strict because you are dealing with people’s lives. The members of AHJ strive to ensure your building is meeting code requirements during the design, construction, and functioning phases. 

 

It’s important to remember that each district has different codes and regulations. 

While following OSHA’s fire safety codes are important, you may find that your local code has additional standards that you must meet in order to remain in compliance. 

 

When was your last fire inspection and maintenance? Our team at VFS supports our clients with regular inspection and testing on their fire protection systems. How much do you know about your fire inspection? Take our quiz to see if you’re smarter than a fire inspector here. 

 

AJH helps keep your building safe

Fire Prevention vs. Fire Protection

VFS Fire and Security Services believes in protecting what matters most. A major component of fire protection that is often overlooked is fire prevention. 

It’s important to understand the difference between fire prevention and fire protection as you look to create a holistic approach to your building’s fire safety.

What is fire prevention?

Fire prevention consists of the actions you take outside of your fire protection systems to help prevent a fire from occurring. The prevention really occurs before a fire occurs, while the protection is for during a fire emergency. While there are many ways to bring fire prevention into the workplace, we’ve pulled together a few of the most common, and most essential parts of your fire prevention plan.

Establish an evacuation strategy.

Establishing an evacuation strategy for your team is essential to the safety and protection of your people. Your evacuation strategy makes it safer and more efficient for your employees and potential customers to exit the building. 

Not only is it essential to keep your employees safe from harm, but OSHA guidelines also require that a business have an emergency evacuation plan in place. See the OSHA regulations for emergency action plans here.

Maintain & Service Your Fire Safety Equipment.

Testing and Inspection

VFS Fire and Security Services believes that your fire protection systems are only as effective as the inspections performed on them. There are main systems that should be considered when looking at your commercial property during a fire and safety inspection: 

  • Fire Sprinkler Systems
  • Fire Suppression Systems
  • Alarm & Detection Systems
  • Portable Fire Extinguishers
  • Sound and Communication
  • Integrated Security
  • Life Safety

Annual (or even more frequent) inspections are a huge part of fire prevention because if a system or piece of equipment fails, then any efforts towards fire protection are most likely to fail. 

Service and Repair

Service and repair of equipment and systems is the next step in understanding fire protection. Service and repair mean staying up to code and in compliance with all service and repair requirements is the goal of fire prevention. 

System Upgrades

How long do you think a fire protection system is supposed to last? If your first thought is 30 years, think again. 


The average lifespan of a fire protection system is 12 to 15 years. 

Keeping your systems updated is a key role in fire protection. Fire protection systems are complicated and there are a lot of moving parts involved. Don’t worry, when an individual part fails, the entire system does not need to be replaced (most of the time). Even if a single part being replaced doesn’t automatically mean throwing out the whole system, there are components that might need to be upgraded with older systems to improve your interconnectivity. 

Fire prevention is the first piece of the puzzle when diving into fire safety for your commercial property.

Employee Fire Prevention Training

One of the major causes of fires in the workplace is human error. People can start fires in a variety of ways in the workplace (really… we’ve seen some crazy stuff!), a few of the most common mishaps typically deal with mishandling chemicals, improper storage of combustible materials, and kitchen accidents. 

Because of this, it is essential that your employees understand proper fire safety and understand what to do in case a fire occurs. Train your employees on the proper ways to operate the business’ machinery, and how to store and remove of hazardous materials. 

Communicate with your Team

One of the best ways you can prevent fires from occurring is with communication. Perform routine fire drills, how to leave the building in a calm and safe manner during this stressful situation. We recommend having both scheduled and unannounced fire drills to ensure your employees are ready when they need to be.

Communication goes beyond practice and proper training. Communication also refers to clear exits and escape routes. Smoke can easily fill a room with people still in it. This smoke makes it difficult to see and find the exit. Posting easy-to-read exit signs and escape routes is essential to the safety of your employees. We would also recommend installing floor lights for easy visibility. 

What is fire protection? 

Safeopedia defined fire protection as, “Measures are taken to prevent fire from becoming destructive, reduce the impact of an uncontrolled fire, and save lives and property.” 

So, a fire protection system exists to lessen the damage of a fire if it occurs. The three main essentials of fire protection are: 

  • Study of Fire
  • Active Fire Protection
  • Passive Fire Protection

The study of fire is our role at VFS Fire and Security Services and paves the way for how we implement fire protection systems. 

Fire protection systems all orchestrate together to prevent the fire from becoming even more destructive or deadly. Making sure that all NFPA building codes are followed with building construction and fire protection system implementation is important with fire safety. 

Having both active and passive fire protection systems in place is important to ensure your building, and more importantly, your team remains safe from harm. 

What is passive fire protection?

Passive fire protection systems are stationary materials designed to prevent the spread of fire and smoke. These systems help keep the fire in its original area, therefore, stopping it from spreading throughout the building. The combination of active and passive fire protection systems can help put out fires faster and stop additional damage from occurring. 

They can also be used to channel the flames out of the building. When you have passive fire protection systems in place, fires that do occur are easier to extinguish. 

These fire protection systems are typically built into your building. When looking to renovate or build on a property, there is a lot of careful planning needed to ensure your building has these passive fire protection systems in place. Our team can help your team design and plan your construction in order to ensure building safety. For example, using cinder block walls as opposed to traditional wood-frame walls helps to reduce the spread of flames. 

However, passive systems can still be added after construction. Structures like smoke baffles, fire doors, and fire-resistant glass partitions can be installed after construction has been completed. 

What is active fire protection?

With an active fire protection (afp) system, some kind of action is taking place. Whether it is manual or automatic, these systems deploy once fire, smoke, or heat is detected. These systems are designed to help combat the fire, and help put it out. 

What active fire protection systems do I need?

SMOKE DETECTORS

Smoke detectors activate when there is smoke in the building. These detectors typically utilize noise and light to alert occupants in the building of a potential fire. 

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

Are manually operated active fire protection measures. These help occupants put out small fires within the building. 

SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

Sprinkler systems are active fire protection systems that automatically activate to help put out the fire while building occupants move to safety. These systems trigger when the heat from the fire causes the sprinkler head to open. 

VENTILATION SYSTEMS

Ventilation systems help direct smoke out of the building and away from the occupants. 

These active fire protection systems are typically installed based on certain legal criteria such as occupancy and building size. Higher than average risk areas, such as areas with flames or cooking implements might require additional active systems for added protection. 

Understanding your unique business needs is exactly what we do at VFS. Our in-house teams help with construction services, special hazard needs, inspection maintenance, and preventative maintenance. We are your partner in success. 

Are you thinking it might be time for a fire protection system upgrade? Learn how much they cost here. (Hint there are many factors that will impact the final cost.) 

Choose your player… the Best Fire Safety Equipment of 2021

Protecting your commercial building is a huge decision and financial commitment. Here are some of the best options in Southern California for fire prevention. 

Autocall

Autocall believes that people and facilities everywhere deserve to be protected by fire detection systems that deliver unparalleled performance. Backed by a legacy of innovation and invention, Autocall is pushing the industry forward with feature-rich fire detection systems that help to ensure that our customers are safe and their facilities are secure.

AES Corporation

AES Corporation is the leading manufacturer of communication products and services designed for the fire, burglary, and facility applications. Learn how an investment in AES’s wireless mesh telecommunications technology can help you take control of your network, pricing, and future.

Ansul

ANSUL® is a global premium brand of Tyco Fire Protection Products. ANSUL special hazard fire protection products are designed and manufactured to strict standards and tested under the scrutiny of national and international independent testing laboratories and approval agencies.

Kidde Fire Systems

Since 1917, Kidde Fire Systems has been a global leader in fire protection, protecting people, property, and processes from fire hazards. Our fire protection solutions include conventional & intelligent detection and control systems that complement a complete line of fire suppression systems.

Potter

Potter Today, Potter is carrying on the legacy of Charles E. Potter by combining the latest technology in fire protection with the dedicated manpower for which they have been known for over one hundred years. With an unwavering dedication to their customers, Potter looks to continue as the industry standard in both product and service.

Valcom

Valcom’s long tradition of communication leadership and innovation addresses our customers’ most complex communication concerns. Our products are developed based on the customer’s need to relay information rapidly so individuals in various locations throughout an organization receive relevant instructions, and act upon them in emergency situations.

Learn what sprinkler system would work best for commercial buildings here

Best Fire Safety Equipment

Suppress Fires, Not Feelings

We get it, you’re working with a tight budget and didn’t consider fire safety as a part of the bottom line. While each commercial building might have different needs and pricing, investing in a clean agent fire suppression system is cheaper than the financial consequences of your building burning down. 

Fire Suppression Systems

Fire suppression systems are used to extinguish or control fires and are activated by heat, smoke, or a combination of the two. Suppression systems are typically found in places like museums, libraries, data centers, and archives. 

Unlike wet-pipe sprinkler systems, suppression systems use gaseous, chemical or foam agents to suppress the fire, rather than water. This aids in the preservation of sensitive equipment and content within a particular environment. There are many different applications of fire suppression depending on the area in which these systems are housed. 

There are different types of fire suppression systems that VFS can install. 

Clean Agent Fire Suppression

Clean agent fire suppression is a term used to describe the use of inert gases to extinguish a fire. These systems all have three main components: 

  • Smoke Detector
  • Control Panel
  • Notification Devices

When the smoke detector is triggered, it sends a signal to the control panel which then alerts the notification devices, activating the release device to suppress the fire.

Clean agent fire suppression systems are fast-acting and most effective in protecting sensitive equipment and environments because they are designed to suppress the fire in its incipient stage. Clean fire agents are electronically nonconducting and unlike water, they won’t ruin electrical components or electronics.

Clean agent fire suppression systems are most often found in server rooms, record/file repositories, and data centers that require an increased level of protection to prevent unnecessary and accidental discharge of systems. 

The Details

  • Inert gases: Nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide work together by lowering oxygen content in a room below the level that supports combustion, while still allowing a person to breathe keeping your environment and your personnel safe. 
  • Fluorocarbon-based extinguishers are described as “clean agents” as they do not leave any oily residues, particulates, or water damage and rapidly extinguish fires with a superb weight to effectiveness ratio. These extinguishing agents are also safe to use in occupied spaces and offer unique advantages in speed, performance, and safety. 

Fun stuff, right? 

There is a range of costs and options available when it comes to clean agent fire suppression systems. Contact VFS Fire & Security Services today to learn more! 

What is a Public Safety DAS? NFPA, ERRCS and AHJ (Plot Twist, these letters actually mean something...)

You’re not alone if you see all the abbreviations in fire safety and think, “How the h*ll am I supposed to know what that all means?” 

DAS Explained

The amount of NFPA codes is a large number (like large as in over 300…), so we understand it’s hard to keep track of them all! Actually, are you trying to test your knowledge? Take our NFPA Fire Codes quiz and see how you do! 

Anyways, DAS stands for, “Distributed antenna system.” And no, we don’t mean the antenna for your cable TV.

The NFPA requires that “Buildings and structures that cannot support the required level of radio coverage shall be equipped with a radiating cable system or a distributed antenna system (DAS) with FCC-certified signal boosters, or both, or with a system that is otherwise approved, in order to achieve the required adequate radio coverage.” 

There are additional factors of the distributed antenna system that any commercial property owner should consider (based on NFPA standards). This might include:

  • Signal Strength
  • Isolation
  • System Radio Frequencies
  • Frequency Changes
  • Critical Areas
  • Radio Coverage

Another main component of NFPA 72 Section 24.5.2 is non-interference. 

In other words, “no amplification system capable of operating on frequencies or causing interference on frequencies assigned to the jurisdiction by the FCC shall be installed without prior coordination and approval of the authority having jurisdiction,” according to the NFPA. “The building manager/owner shall suspend and correct other equipment installations that degrade the performance of the public safety radio system or public safety radio enhancement system.” 

Let’s Talk ERRCS

So surprise, ERRCS is one in the same as DAS. An Emergency Responder Radio Communication (ERRCS) is crucial to have in commercial buildings. An ERRCS can also be identified as a Public Safety or First Responder DAS. 

It turns out all of the fire protection abbreviations can be interchangeable!

How About AHJ?

AHJ, the last acronym to understand for today’s lesson! AHJ stands for, “Authority Having Jurisdiction.” It can be a common misconception that the local fire marshall is responsible for any updates in fire safety. But this is not the case. Oftentimes there are multiple people or authorities who have jurisdiction and are responsible for a facility’s fire safety standards and practices.

The NFPA has regulations set under Code 70E

“In a commercial or industrial facility, subsequent installation of electrical equipment or modification of the distribution system is often not done under a government permit nor is this inspected by the government AHJ.” 

A good question to keep in mind listed from the NFPA is, “Does your management invite a government AHJ to inspect and approve the installation of a new subpanel, the move of a production line, the retrofit for a breakroom, the extension of a circuit, or the addition of a backup generator in your facility?”

Have more questions about these confusing acronyms? Reach out to VFS Fire & Security Services today! 

What is a Public Safety DAS? NFPA, ERRCS and AHJ (Plot Twist, these letters actually mean something...)

What is a Public Safety DAS? NFPA, ERRCS and AHJ (Plot Twist, these letters actually mean something…)

Building Compliance vs. Building Complaints (clearly marked fire exits)

Building Compliance vs. Building Complaints (Not a Spelling Error!)

There’s a good reason for the codes and standards established by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Compliance isn’t a punishment, it’s a roadmap to safety, protection, and long-term sustainability.

With over 300 codes written in “legal-ese,” it’s not always as intuitive as it should be to comply with fire safety codes. So, we’ve created a cheat sheet to steer you in the right direction— it doesn’t have to be so overwhelming.

300 Fire Protection Compliance Codes?!?

Do you think you know them all? If you dare, check out our latest quiz to test your fire code knowledge. 

Unless you score perfectly on the fire safety quiz, it’s likely that your building does not have to comply with all 300 NFPA codes and standards. Searching the NFPA’s database here can simplify the process.

Codes you’ll regularly encounter, however, might include: 

NFPA 99

Health Care Facilities Code

NFPA 72®

National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code®

And others that are very specific, such as: 

NFPA 418

Standard for Heliports

Compliance isn’t the goal. Safety is the goal, and—in that vein—we always recommend the following precautions be taken.

Dispose of Excess Packaging in Real-Time

It seems like the stuff of action moves, and yet, it happens all the time. Piles of boxes can fuel a fire that might otherwise be easily managed. Oily rags can spontaneously combust. Rag disposal is essential to safety. Ensure you dispose of excess packaging in real-time.

Don’t Put a Lantern in the Shed with The Cow. 

Check your fire extinguishers. An expired extinguisher is not only frustrating, but it can be deadly. A popping sound when you turn on the light is a warning! Inspect electric lines that are old or unreliable. These tips and tricks might all seem out of pocket, but one day you might thank us for not putting that lantern next to your beloved cow, Betty. 

Get Honest Regarding our Disaster Preparedness

Whether it be for fire, earthquake, flood, locusts, and any other eventuality, get honest about your current disaster preparedness.

If you haven’t already, make sure everyone knows what to do, who is in charge, how to get out, and where to go following. This is a serious one for anyone who owns a business in California especially. The earthquakes have already started and don’t seem to be slowing down. 

Bring in the VFS Experts

We’ve seen it all. Our teams can ensure compliance and that it isn’t all you’re doing to prevent fires. We are a full fire and life safety contractor and after-market service, provider. Whether your fire prevention needs are related to fire sprinkler systems, alarms systems, extinguishers, backflows, fire pumps, suppression, special hazards, monitoring, DAS systems, emergency notification (the list goes on and on!), we can not only inspect and maintain those systems but also design, build, and install! With our inspections program, we manage, schedule, and track your inspections, deficiencies, and repairs so you don’t have to. 

At VFS Fire & Security Services, we pride ourselves on the caliber of our team members, our commitment to a holistic understanding of your needs, and our-list wine collection (get to know our founder!). We are the team you want to bring to your project.  Connect with us, take a look inside our new site!

It's summer vacation ... but not for you. Get your fire safety up to par

The sun is out, the air smells like sunscreen and … summer school! 

School buildings provide an important space for youth and educators, so there is great risk if there is no evacuation plan in place. 

Seems overwhelming? Don’t worry, the best part is that we do the work for you! 

Evacuation Plan

There are other outlier factors that need to be considered while creating a solid evacuation plan. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) provides some startling facts about fires that start in school buildings: 

  • “School fires most often originated in a lavatory or locker room
  • Fires that were intentionally set were the leading cause of school fires, accounting for almost two of every five fires
  • Two-thirds of school fires occurred between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
  • In 2014-2018, the U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 3,230 structure fires in schools each year
  • These fires caused annual averages of one civilian death, 39 civilian injuries, and $37 million in direct property damage.” 

Since most fires start in locker rooms and bathrooms, the evacuation plan must be centered around those geographical locations. This will look different for each educational building based on the layout of the property. 

Draw a Floor Plan

When making a blueprint of the building, highlight exits and other fire safety tools (think fire hoses, extinguishers, and emergency phones). Make sure all staff know this plan inside and out, so in case of an emergency everyone’s prepared with the evacuation plan. 

More Tips

Cluing in students at an educational facility is also important to successfully follow through an evacuation plan. Assemblies and test fire alarms are a great way to start. 

Another option is to have posters around the educational building with reminders of fire safety tips and what to do in an evacuation. Some of these may include: 

  • Don’t use the elevator, always choose the stairs
  • Never go back into the building unless given permission by authorities
  • Call 911 as soon as possible
  • Always leave through the nearest exit
  • Leave your personal items behind

We protect property and lives, while providing a sense of security and peace of mind. 

VFS is here to help you improve your fire safety plan in educational buildings, find more on our website.  

WHY DOES YOUR BUILDING NEED PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE?

Preventative fire and life safety system maintenance can save your building costly repairs.  More importantly, it can keep your people safe from faulty equipment accidents.

Why does your building need preventative maintenance inspections?

Your building occupants’ safety and wellbeing is your top priority as a building owner. Fires and other incidents are unpredictable, but you should prepare for the possibility they do occur. In order to stay properly prepared for emergencies, regular fire system inspections are essential. You need to know when your systems are faulty, in order to fix them before potential emergencies occur. 

The National Fire Protection Association, your local authorities who have jurisdiction, and the International Code Council implement fines for not following inspection standards. Fines and penalties, however, are the least of your worries if your alarm, sprinkler, or fire suppression systems don’t work when you need them.

How else can fire system inspection help your business?

With ongoing fire preventative maintenance, you create a safer work environment for your employees. Your employees won’t fear the danger of a fire breaking out in the office, because your systems will be running efficiently and effectively. Because of this, your employees, visitors, and customers will have a greater sense of security.

Your employees will also be able to be more productive. Not to mention, avoiding costly long-term losses and limited operations in a building that has experienced fire. 

Fire system inspections can also prevent your business from paying large fees for noncompliance, as stated above. When you perform preventative maintenance on your systems, you mitigate the cost of replacing unmaintained, corroded, or damaged equipment.

What types of fire systems need inspection and maintenance?

Your fire inspection requirements will vary depending on your facility, the state you operate in, and the various fire protection systems within your building. The type of preventative maintenance varies based on the type of fire system. The NFPA and ICC require that these systems receive an inspection regularly as follows: 

Fire Sprinkler Systems

These systems require weekly, employee inspections for dry, pre-action, deluge systems gauges, and control valves. Monthly employee inspections for wet pipe system gauges, and alarm valves.

Annual professional inspections are required for specific pieces of equipment. They are required for the building, hanger/seismic bracing, pipes/fittings, and sprinkler heads. Along with information signage, spare sprinkler heads, pre-action/deluge valves, dry pipe valves, and backflow prevention assemblies.

Lastly, they require a 5-year inspection for internal inspection of sprinkler piping, obstructions, and a valve check. 

Backflow Preventer Assemblies

Backflow preventer assemblies require a licensed sprinkler inspection company to inspect these systems annually. These inspections ensure your facility’s drinking water is safe and to ensure the sprinkler systems work properly.

Fire Suppression Systems

These non-water based fire suppression systems require a bi-annual inspection by a licensed fire protection technician. These inspections ensure there is the proper amount of clean agent available, the container is pressurized, and there is no damage to the container. 

Kitchen Hood Suppression Systems 

A licensed fire protection company must inspect your kitchen hood fire suppression systems every 6 months. These inspections are done to ensure your suppression systems will activate in the event of a fire. It ensure they put the fire out and shut off the gas or electricity used to run the equipment.

Fire Alarms

Routine maintenance is required by a trained employee must inspect the fire alarm components, control panels, power supplies, fuses, LEDs, and trouble signals once a week. They must also inspect the batteries for corrosion once a month. A licensed technician must inspect the initiating devices (heat, smoke, dust detectors) semi-annually. They must also inspect all the fire components and equipment once a year. 

Fire Extinguishers

Fire extinguishers require monthly inspections to ensure the pressure gauge is on full, the hose is intact, and the pin is secure. A certified professional must inspect the fire extinguishers yearly. 

At VFS, we provide inspections, testing, and maintenance of fire sprinklers and fire alarm systems. Our trained personnel conduct all inspections as outlined by the requirements of NFPA. As well as abiding by the local codes that apply to your specific area of operation.

With VFS, your preventative maintenance is top-of-mind. Your inspections will always be up to code and easy to access and schedule with our team!

HIGH-RISK, HIGH REWARD? NOT WHEN IT COMES TO FIRE SAFETY! (NOT A CANNABIS REFERENCE)

When it comes to buildings that contain flammable chemicals, gases, and other materials, fire protection is not something to gamble with. Not only will top-of-the-line fire protection keep your building safe, but it will also ensure that workers remain safe from harm. In this high-risk industry, it is essential that you don’t roll the dice on fire safety measures. 

According to OSHA, from 2013 to 2017, 489 oil and gas extraction workers were killed on the job. Getting your fire protection systems in check is like having pocket aces, it sets you up for the greatest success possible. Here are a few tips for you to begin prioritizing your fire safety protocols. 

Assess workplace preparedness

It’s essential to start with an inspection of your fire safety. These inspections lead to a greater understanding of your preparedness, and typically reveal vulnerabilities that you were previously unaware of. During this inspection, be sure to look for particular areas that have a higher risk for flash fires and explosions. 

You should also be on the lookout for fire equipment that is old or malfunctioning, and be sure to replace them with ones that are in good working condition. Not only should you look for vulnerabilities in your fire extinguishers, but also in your fire sprinkler systems. 

A great preventative measure is doing your own monthly visual inspections, as there are developments that can occur between the required NFPA inspections. Grab a notepad, take a walk and canvas your facility looking for any obvious visual deficiencies – corrosion, leaks, obstructions or painted sprinkler heads. With any luck you’re clear of any obvious deficiencies but if you’re not, call your fire protection company (hopefully VFS) to get these assessed and repaired preemptively. A little proactive measure can go a long way to prevent unnecessary accidents and keep your systems working in prime condition. 

Ensure emergency equipment is accessible onsite

With workers coming in and out of your facility, it’s important to have a supply of emergency equipment at their workstations and other areas near these stations. The equipment should include materials like fixed and portable fire extinguishers. This helps ensure the safety of your workers, as well as allows your employees to put out a small fire before it begins to spread. 

Ensure workers are trained to utilize equipment

In order to ensure your plan is effective, you must train your employees to know what to do in the event of a fire. They should receive instructional materials for the tools they may need to use, as well as participate in training that shows them how to physically use the equipment, and how to exit the building in case of emergency. 

Part of this training should include fire drills that help to reinforce the safety procedures and educate your workers on how to exit the building. You should also ensure all evacuation signage and exits are clearly marked, enough to see in the event of a fire. 

Utilize detection equipment to measure gas levels

In the oil and gas industry, it is essential to monitor the gas levels throughout your building. Combustible and toxic gas detection systems can help ensure your team avoids activities that may trigger a fire to occur. If a flammable gas goes beyond 10% of the lower explosive level, your workers should refrain from working. Ensure your employees know what levels are acceptable to remain working in, and which gases may be potentially hazardous. 

Ensure alert systems are installed to communicate fire risks

Lastly, ensure you have alert systems in place to communicate with your workers regarding the safety hazards throughout the facility. When a fire occurs, employees need to be immediately made aware in order to allow them to evacuate the building/work area safely. Alarm and mass notification systems are needed to alert employees of the danger.

At VFS, your high-risk facility is our top priority. We specialize in providing top-of-the-line fire safety support for special hazard facilities. Our fire and life safety systems integrate every aspect of a building from security systems, to fire protection and suppression to alarm and communication systems. We operate in 35 of the 50 states through our partnerships with local experts.

DO YOU HAVE A RELIABLE ALARM SYSTEM?

Do you know the benefits of having a reliable alarm monitoring system? Or the potential dangers of not implementing one? With everything that’s been thrown our way in the past year, you should have at least one reliable system in your life: a reliable alarm system!

The ongoing global coronavirus pandemic, Australian Bushfires, and Hurricane Laura across the Midwest, 2020 showed us the importance of being prepared against natural disasters. I mean, really, this past year made us expect the unexpected!

Despite the uncontrollable nature of these events, we’re pushed to remember the importance of investing in the health and safety of our organizations. Is your fire alarm monitoring reliable and ready to take on whatever comes its way? If it’s MeshWrx, it is!

There are lots of options when it comes to fire alarm monitoring services. We know, it can be overwhelming. But MeshWrx makes it easy! Here’s a rundown of what our reliable alarm systems look like.

WHAT IS THE MESH NETWORK DIFFERENCE?

Did you know that mesh network technology was originally developed for demanding military communication pathways? Talk about reliability! Today, mesh networks are still trusted by military, fire, and police departments. Simply put: Mesh networks are the crème de la crème of reliability.

But what is a mesh network system? Wireless mesh networks consist of a collection of wireless routers that provide network access to clients, typically in commercial buildings. These specific mesh routers act as entry points to reliable and established central monitoring stations.

Mesh network alarm monitoring systems were designed with the intent to be reliable, cost-effective, and hassle-free. And that’s exactly how they operate today.

Traditional, low-tier alarm systems and other single-route systems are widely susceptible to environmental disturbances and even equipment problems.

For example, a cellular alarm system uses local cellular service to relay fire alarm signals from the building to the nearest cell tower. The signal is then relayed to an internet gateway by point-to-point microwaves or fiber optic cables. Once it is on the internet, it is routed to the central monitoring station.

A traditional alarm system only shares a percentage of the reliability of a mesh network system and experiences more dead spots. And as far as reliability is concerned, cellular networks do have a single point of failure, which may cause issues. If any part of the communication system goes down, the communication link is broken.

It’s a lengthy process to contact the help you need—up to 45 seconds in some cases. In a situation like this, every second matters. And think, how many times have your cellular calls dropped or failed? Do you really want to be relying on the quality of a cell phone tower?

On the opposite side, mesh networks are continually optimizing a variety of signal pathways to get theirs through to the help you rely on most. With our network of towers, you never have to worry about the reliability of your signals getting through to the central station. We’ve got your back! 

HOW ABOUT A REAL-LIFE EXAMPLE?

Do you remember Hurricane Harvey? Way back in 2017? The aftermath of this category 4 hurricane was devastating—with catastrophic flooding that resulted in over 100 deaths. But did you know that mesh technology was the only uninterrupted source of communication during this natural disaster? 

Landlines, IP, and cellular all crashed during this emergency, but not their mesh network system. And that’s the MeshWrx difference.

A HANDY LIST OF BENEFITS

If you’re still not convinced of the reliability of a mesh network system, 1) we’re surprised and 2) let us help you. Here are some additional reasons as to why a MeshWrx alarm system might be right for you.

  • Prevent property damage
  • Communicate with professionals at top speed
  • 24-hour protection and reliability

And the greatest benefit of all? The sense of comfort and security you gain when choosing MeshWrx. Choosing MeshWrx fire alarm monitoring gives you an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ mentality.

You can be more productive, safe, and focused on the work at hand, knowing that you and all members of your organization are safe.

Your employees will exhale a sigh of relief knowing that if a fire were to occur, emergency responders would be notified immediately and that they could proceed to safely exit the building.

IS YOUR ALARM RELIABLE?

Whatever your industry, from education to healthcare, we have a one-stop fire alarm monitoring solution that will give you confidence and peace of mind. You don’t want to be wondering if your alarm system is up to the task when an unexpected emergency hits. You need to ensure your alarm system is reliable and up for the challenge.

Mesh networks provide a holistic approach to ensuring your alarm monitoring needs are met and are trusted by the demanding military, police, and fire communication pathways.

Because when it comes to the safety of yourself and your organization, being out of style isn’t cute. Mesh networks are the future of alarm monitoring systems. Don’t be ‘that guy.’ Instead, stay prepared, stay safe. Contact MeshWrx today to see how we can help your company’s fire protection systems thrive!

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS

THE FOAM ON THE TOP OF YOUR GUINNESS SHOULDN’T BE THE ONLY THING YOU’RE WORRIED ABOUT THIS ST. PATRICK’S DAY

Your needs as a business owner vary on the type of building you own. You’ve likely heard and implemented many fire protection systems, but do you know the key differences between a fire sprinkler system and a fire suppression system? It’s important to understand these differences. 

CLEAN AGENT FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS

These fire suppression systems utilize environmentally-friendly chemical reagents to put out fires. These are typically found in sensitive areas, such as a data center. The chemicals used are water-free and safe for the environment. Once a clean agent system activates, the clean-up is minimal. 

CARBON DIOXIDE FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS

These systems use CO2 colorless, odorless gas to extinguish a fire. This option is an incredibly efficient and cost-effective approach to fire protection. The clean-up after the system has been activated is minimal.

These systems are currently being used by the U.S Navy in commercial shipping applications. It is common to find these systems in industries that handle steel and aluminum. 

INDUSTRIAL FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS

Industrial plants need extra attention when it comes to fire protection, as most of the areas are in high-hazard environments. The fires that occur in these areas typically involve some type of chemical, liquid fuel, or other hazardous materials, therefore proper fire protection systems are essential. These systems typically use dry chemicals to extinguish the fire. 

RESTAURANT FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS

When you’re at the pub this St. Patrick’s Day (virtually or with a mask on) you’ll find that in the kitchen there are specific fire suppression systems. (We know you won’t notice, because you’ll be singing along to Sweet Caroline with a Guinness in hand- and we don’t blame you, we’ll be doing the same.)

However, those fire suppression systems are essential to keeping you and your drunk counterparts from going up in flames! These suppression systems extinguish fires fueled by grease in a kitchen environment. They typically utilize wet chemicals in a mist form to extinguish the fire quickly and effectively. 

Fire protection systems needed for high-hazard areas are among the most technical and specialized fire equipment systems. At VFS, we pride ourselves on being a renowned leader in the special hazards sector

Our founder and CEO, Randy Nelson, sits on the technical committee for NFPA 16 (Code Standard for the Installation of Foam-Water Sprinkler) and understands just how critical proper installation and maintenance is on these specialized systems. We bring our robust knowledge, expertise, and experience to find the safest and most reliable solution for every unique need and environment your building has!

ACTIVE VS. PASSIVE FIRE PROTECTION

WHEN YOUR WIFE SAYS “I’M FINE…” HOW TO PUT OUT FIRES (BECAUSE YOUR RELATIONSHIP IS ABOUT TO GO UP IN FLAMES)

As a husband, the last thing you want to hear is your wife passive-aggressively saying “I’m fine…” You know exactly what that means- it’s time to put out a figurative fire because your relationship is about to go up in flames. As a building owner, the flames you need to avoid aren’t quite as figurative. 

In order to fight very real fires that can occur in your building, you need to implement proper fire protection systems. Both active and passive fire protection systems are necessary to keep your building, and more importantly, your people safe from harm. 

WHAT IS PASSIVE FIRE PROTECTION?

The word ‘passive’ has a connotation that the object in question is something that is not expected to produce results. Your wife’s passive-aggressive comments beg to differ, and so do your passive fire protection systems.  In fact, passive fire protection (pfp) can be equally, if not more, effective than active fire protection. 

Passive fire protection systems are stationary materials designed to prevent the spread of fire and smoke. These systems help keep the fire in its original area, therefore, stopping it from spreading throughout the building. The combination of active and passive fire protection systems can help put out fires faster and stop additional damage from occurring. 

These fire protection systems are typically built into your building. When looking to renovate or build on a property, there is a lot of careful planning needed to ensure your building has these passive fire protection systems in place. Our team can help your team design and plan your construction in order to ensure building safety. For example, using cinder block walls as opposed to traditional wood-frame walls help to reduce the spread of flames. 

However, passive systems can still be added after construction. Structures like smoke baffles, fire doors, and fire-resistant glass partitions can be installed after construction has been completed. 

The objective of a passive fire protection system is to hold the smoke and flames in one contained area. They can also be used to channel the flames out of the building. When you have passive fire protection systems in place, fires that do occur are easier to extinguish. 

WHAT IS ACTIVE FIRE PROTECTION?

With an active fire protection (afp) system, some kind of action is taking place. Whether it is manual or automatic, these systems deploy once fire, smoke, or heat is detected. These systems are designed to help combat the fire, and help put it out. 

MOST BUILDINGS ARE EQUIPPED WITH A FEW ACTIVE SYSTEMS THAT CAN BE DEPLOYED ONSITE DURING A FIRE.

SMOKE DETECTORS

Smoke detectors activate when there is smoke in the building. These detectors typically utilize noise and light to alert occupants in the building of the potential fire. 

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

Are manually operated active fire protection measures. These help occupants put out small fires within the building. 

SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

Sprinkler systems are active fire protection systems that automatically activate to help put out the fire while building occupants move to safety. These systems trigger when the heat from the fire causes the sprinkler head to open. There are various types of fire sprinkler systems that can be beneficial for your business. 

Understanding your unique business needs is exactly what we do at VFS. Our in-house teams help with construction services, special hazard needs, inspection maintenance, and preventative maintenance. We are your partner in success. 

VENTILATION SYSTEMS

Ventilation systems help direct smoke out of the building and away from the occupants. 

These active fire protection systems are typically installed based on certain legal criteria such as occupancy and building size. Higher than average risk areas, such as areas with flames or cooking implements might require additional active systems for added protection. 

HOW DO PASSIVE AND ACTIVE FIRE PROTECTION MEASURES WORK TOGETHER?

A combined effort of passive and active systems is essential to the safety of your building and its occupants. Active systems effectively help occupants evacuate or fight the flames, these systems typically have a greater likelihood of error. 

Passive systems should be installed throughout the building as a way to support active systems. A great example of passive and active systems working together is smoke curtains. These passive fire protection systems help direct smoke toward vents, where smoke can leave the building. Passive systems can also help force flames and smoke to remain in one area.

New buildings should implement these passive fire protection systems into the design and build phase of construction. Our Design/Build team at VFS can help ensure your building is protected from harm when it is finished. Older buildings, which do not have these passive systems built-in, can be retrofitted with smoke curtains and panels as an added layer of protection. 

Active and passive fire protection systems together can prevent expensive damages, catastrophic injuries, and potential loss of life. Implementing both systems into your building is essential to the safety of your building. 

At VFS, we believe in helping your company meet the needs of your unique building. Every building is different, every building needs different protection systems in place. Our teams think creatively to come up with solutions that ensure your building remains safe from harm. Reach out to us today to see how we can help your business today! 

TOP 7 FIRE HAZARDS AROUND THE HOLIDAYS

It’s Lit! Holiday Fire Safety Tips for Roasting Chestnuts on an Open Fire 

JK… Open Fires are Very Dangerous

It’s almost the New Year, and you know what that means… it’s time to light it up! But be careful. 2021 has shown us you can never be too careful when it comes to health and safety. In other words, don’t go out of 2021 with a literal bang…

Keep in mind a few fire safety precautions as you ring in the new year. We’re a fire prevention company, so what else would we be talking about going into the New Year? Here are some fire safety tips to consider.

YOUR SMOKE DETECTOR MAY BE ANNOYING, BUT THERE’S A REASON

We understand the ringing from a smoke detector is the last thing you want to hear during the holidays. (Depending on who you ask, it’s arguably better than hearing Mariah Carey’s ‘All I Want’ for the 100th time though…)

Regardless, smoke detectors have a purpose and that purpose is to keep you safe. Be sure your smoke detectors are up-to-date and have working batteries as you ring in the new year.

JUST LIKE THE AIRPORT, UNATTENDED BAGGAGE – IN THIS CASE, POTS AND PANS – SHOULD BE SUBJECT TO REMOVAL

The holiday season brings about quite a few family dinners and get-togethers that are centered around a meal. With aunts, uncles, or even just your immediate family, the kitchen can get a bit chaotic during the holiday season. It’s easy to become overwhelmed and distracted, and potentially forget about a pan on the stove or a simmering pot. Yikes!

Did you know the majority of kitchen fires begin with unattended pots and pans? While you’re cooking it’s important to remain present and aware of your surroundings.

Another useful tip is to keep clutter to a minimum, especially in the kitchen.

ROCKIN’ AROUND AN OPEN FLAME JUST ISN’T AS CATCHY…

The glow of your Christmas tree is beautiful, we agree; however, be sure you take precautions to ensure your safety. Christmas trees are one of the most common fire hazards during the holidays.

Make sure your tree remains hydrated and away from heat sources. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), 25% of the Christmas tree fires that occur do so because the tree was too close to a heat source, like a candle or space heater.

YES, WE KNOW IT IS COLD, YES, THE AMBIANCE OF YOUR FIREPLACE IS PERFECT, BUT PLEASE BE CAREFUL

According to the NFPA, heating equipment is the second cause of house fires each year. We understand that heating your home is important.

You want to stay warm and cozy during these cold months, but you also need to stay safe. The last thing you want is to be standing out in the freezing cold while the fire department hoses down your house…

When using a space heater, ensure it is at least three feet from flammable items, including decor, upholstery, and Christmas trees.

As far as your fireplace goes, be sure your damper is open, a protective screen is in play, and gifts and other items remain far away. Fireplaces can crackle and release embers that could spark into something more dangerous than being on the naughty list.

OVERPACKING YOUR OUTLET IS NOT LIKE OVERPACKING FOR YOUR HOLIDAY VACATION… IT’S WORSE!

While there are plenty of things that need to be plugged in during the holiday season, it’s important not to overcrowd outlets. Electrical shorts and malfunctions are some of the leading causes of electrical fires.

As you string your lights and plug more decor into an outlet, be sure the outlet’s total load does not exceed 15 amps. While it may be tempting to have your house shining at all times during the holidays, turn off your decor when you leave the house and when you go to bed as a safety precaution.

BE AWARE OF INDOOR AND OUTDOOR DECOR

As you decorate for each respective holiday, it’s important to test all lights and cords. Then, replace anything faulty prior to use. Candles should be placed out of reach of children and be sure to extinguish them before you leave the room.

As far as outdoor decor goes, only use extension cords and light displays intended for outdoor use. Those cords should be kept away from both snow and standing water to avoid damage to the insulation.

Cords should not be pinched in doors, windows, or placed under furniture. Keep in mind, metal ladders conduct electricity, so opt for a wood or fiberglass ladder instead.

THE LAST THING YOU NEED THIS YEAR IS TO LOSE A FINGER, BE CAREFUL WITH YOUR FIREWORKS

You may want to celebrate the start of 2022 with fireworks. We understand, it’s tradition. It’s important, however, to be aware of the safety hazards that come with fireworks.

According to the NFPA, 10% of fireworks fires occur during the period from December 30- January 3, with a peak on New Year’s Day.

If you choose to set off fireworks on your own:

  • Check local laws prior
  • Choose a location away from buildings and trees
  • Ensure any spectators stand well away from the site
  • Keep water or a fire extinguisher close by in case of emergency

As we Californians know, if you’re experiencing a drought in your area, it is recommended that you cancel the fireworks show altogether.

While all of these safety precautions may seem daunting or even annoying as you tackle the holidays, they are extremely important to your safety. From our team at VFS, we wish you a happy and safe holiday season!

Speaking of stressful seasons, are you worried about preparing your property for hurricane season? Read how to prepare on our blog.

7 holiday fire hazard tips

reg inspections

VFS Fire & Security Services is a company that challenges the status quo in the industry. According to Randy Nelson, CEO, “VFS has grown into a cutting edge company that focuses on innovation in an industry where the way things are done, quite frankly, has not changed much in the past 100 years. This industry has typically been slow to adopt new technology, but VFS is leading the way!”

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“RUN LIKE HELL” IS NOT A FIRE SAFETY PROTOCOL

Cold storage fire protection systems have traditionally been an area of concern.  Managers of these systems have had difficulty in the past with the ability to store at high levels and also the ability to expand the hazard classification for what could be stored.  Now, VFS is pleased to announce a new solution – the Quell™ Fire Sprinkler System.  

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