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sprinkler systems

By Jackie Berens

How Sprinkler Systems Can Save Your Building

Sprinkler systems don’t just protect your building from potential fires, but from alien invasions too!

I think we all agree, it’s best to be prepared for anything. We’ve seen quite a few once-in-a-lifetime events in the last few months, proving that anything can really happen. We’ve seen footage of UFOs, a Firenado, simultaneous hurricanes, and, oh yes, a global pandemic this year. So how outrageous could an alien invasion be?

As we’ve seen in Aliens 3, the best way to defeat aliens is by using your building’s sprinkler system. Aside from protecting you from an alien invasion, why do commercial buildings require sprinkler systems?

The reason you need a fire sprinkler system

Fire sprinkler systems assist all your fire safety protocols in fighting potential fires and protecting your building’s assets, people, and contents. These systems are an active measure to protect against fires and prevent lives and property damage. They help to limit the fire’s spread and give firefighters ample time to save your building.

Fire sprinklers detect heat from a fire source and trigger the sprinkler head to release water in specific locations. Their purpose is to extinguish the fire or slow it down before the firefighters arrive.

How do I know if a fire sprinkler system is required for my building?

Most commercial buildings require a sprinkler system to be installed, especially in new construction, remodels, and renovations. There are a few sprinkler systems requirements in commercial buildings, the International Building code states the following: 

  1. Sprinkler systems allow builders to increase the footprint of the building. 

Adding sprinkler systems throughout your building allows for a larger building footprint and a higher building height. At VFS, our teams help to plan and budget for new construction sites and assist your team from the planning stages all the way through to completion. Our in-house Design/Build departments produce the highest quality and most accurate results to ensure the safety of your building.

  1. Different occupancies and uses require specific systems.

Certain commercial buildings use group or occupancy-use to determine how the sprinkler systems will be implemented throughout the building. All residential buildings require occupancy load determinants, while other commercial buildings typically use fire areas to determine sprinkler systems management.

  1. Special hazards require sprinkler systems. 

Special hazards environments require the most reliable and advanced fire suppression systems on the market. At VFS we provide not only the systems but the specialized knowledge and certified and trained technicians who install, service, and inspect special hazards fire protection systems including, deluge, foam-based, water mist, dry chemical, and clean agent systems, including FM-200 and carbon dioxide. Special hazard safety begins with the professional integration of the specific fire protection systems required within the environment.

What type of commercial fire sprinkler systems do you need?

Wet Pipe Commercial Sprinkler Systems

Wet pipe commercial sprinkler systems are made up of piping that fills with water when under pressure. These pipes remain filled with water until a fire triggers the sprinkler head to turn on. These are the most frequently used sprinkler systems, as they are extremely simple to use and reliable when you need them most. These systems are also cost-effective in both installation and maintenance. One of the major issues with these sprinkler systems is leaks can occur when temperatures go below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Pre-Action Commercial Sprinkler Systems

In certain commercial buildings, some instances may cause sprinkler systems to discharge accidentally. Pre-action sprinkler systems are designed with a valve to hold water back until certain events have taken place that will then trigger water to flow within the pipes and extinguish the fire. There are two types of pre-action systems, single interlock, and double interlock. These systems require certain events to happen in order to trigger water to flow. Let’s talk about them! 


Single Interlock 

Single interlock pre-action systems operate in a similar manner as the dry pipe system. This type of system requires a singular event to occur before water is released into the system; fire detection from a heat or smoke detector that will trigger the pre-action valve to open.

Each sprinkler head individually opens, to ensure the sprinkler head doesn’t turn on preemptively. These systems are uniquely effective for spaces that contain sensitive equipment or costly materials. However, these systems are complex in design, which therefore makes them higher in installation price and in maintenance costs.

Double Interlock 

As you could probably guess the double interlock pre-action system requires two events to occur before releasing water in the system; fire detection from a heat or smoke detector and automatic sprinkler operation. One of the above actions occurs the pre-action valve operates allowing water into the system piping. These actions introduce an extra layer of security from accidental discharge where unintended activation can be damaging to sensitive environments. 

Foam Water Commercial Sprinkler System

Typically sprinkler systems utilize water to extinguish fires. However, for some fires, water will actually make it worse. Foam water fire sprinkler systems mix water with foam concentrate mix that works to put out the fire. The fire started by gas or alcohol needs a foam solvent to extinguish it as quickly and as safely as possible. The foam is used to stifle the flames and eliminate the opportunity for a re-flash. 

Dry Pipe Commercial Sprinkler Systems

These sprinkler systems were designed to mitigate the leaking issue that comes with wet pipe sprinkler systems. Rather than pressurized water remaining in the entire sprinkler system, these systems are only filled with air or nitrogen indirect, non-heated piping. These systems are designed for buildings that reside in freezing temperatures. Because the water doesn’t reside in the piping system from the start, these sprinkler systems have a delay of up to 60 seconds until the water is discharged. 

Deluge Sprinkler Systems

Deluge fire sprinklers are used in high hazard environments such as power plants, aircraft hangars, and chemical storage facilities where significant amounts of water are needed to cool and control the development of a fire. They are connected to a water supply through a deluge valve while the sprinkler heads remain open which releases water to all open sprinkler heads simultaneously. These systems are incredibly effective in high-hazard environments because they release water or another suppressing agent to all open sprinkler heads simultaneously.

At VFS Fire & Security Services we don’t stop at the basics, we apply our full book of expertise to the systems that need them and follow the specific requirements depending on the particular authority having jurisdiction. Every environment is unique and has its own set of specific requirements and the experts at VFS will help get your business up to code every step of the way.

You need to be prepared for whatever comes your way — including alien invasions! At VFS, we offer preventative and inspection maintenance to ensure your systems are running effectively and efficiently. 

Your business needs to be kept safe, we understand what it takes to make that happen.  

 

Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

By Becca Jones

MIC Prevention (not the kind you drop after karaoke)

Most people hear the word MIC and are brought back to either a cringy middle school talent show or a late karaoke night. 

After reading this article, your second thoughts are going to be, “Oh, Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion.” 

M.I.C.

Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) sounds scary—because it is. The tiny bacteria follow the process of attachment, growth, and dispersal. There are many reasons why preventing MIC is essential for fire and safety security services. 

The quick process of MIC will cause massive damage to specific points in the surface, instead of universally and evenly throughout the surface. As a result, there are costly repairs that will set your business back. 

The attachment phase needs to be targeted first in prevention. During the attachment phase, free-floating microbial bacteria anchor to a surface within minutes of the encounter and start to produce a polymer film. 

Again, within minutes. 

The rest of the MIC process is just as crucial to prevent, but harder to catch. Some of the hazards that are threatening your spaces during the MIC process are: 

  • Self-organized highly-structured biofilm starts to rapidly reproduce and grow
  • Because of the evolution portions, the cells are released to colonize new surfaces
  • The tubercle starts with the creation of biofilm in the attachment phase
  • There is a deprivation of oxygen that causes the bacteria to thrive
  •  Highly acidic environments result in a concentrated and accelerated rate of corrosion
  • This all can lead to pinhole leaks

Sounds fun, right? 

The short time frame (of once again, minutes) doesn’t leave any room for mistakes in MIC prevention.

Fear not, because VFS is here to assist in showing that there are daily habits that you can take to avoid Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion. 

General Corrosion

There are a lot of scientific terms thrown into the paragraphs above, so you may be wondering: what’s the difference between MIC and general corrosion? 

Well to sum it up, they’re both bad news. 

General corrosion is less significant than MIC because it fails to alter a pipe’s interior surface, causes less damage and repair. While MIC targets concentrated surface areas at a greater force, general corrosion is an even layer, with a slower rate of disintegration.

Both types of corrosion can cause a lot of damage, but focusing on Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion prevention will help your business for the long haul.

Why is it a threat?

Well, MIC is primarily an issue of corrosion in both dry and pre-action sprinkler systems.

Corrosion of any type (especially MIC), is a growing concern for anyone with commercial fire protection in place. The aftermath of corrosion is not pretty and a guaranteed out-of-pocket expense. Corrosion might result in:

  • Property damage
  • Production time lost
  • Increased maintenance costs
  • Shorter service life
  • System inefficiency: pipe obstruction, plugging
  • The worsening quality of system hydraulics
  • Pinhole leaks

Both dry and pre-action fire suppression systems primarily use compressed air. This, however, is what leads to corrosion. Compressed air is made of both oxygen and moisture. Trapped oxygen within the sprinkler system mixes with water, which reacts negatively with the material of the internal pipes—the perfect environment for MIC bacteria to thrive!

Okay we know it’s a problem… Now what? 

There are various solutions to the scary “C-word” … aka corrosion. Some of the solutions are more intensive and expensive than others. 

Chemical Injections

Chemical Injections can be included in regular system maintenance, but there are some potential side effects:

  • It’s very costly
  • Chemicals can become harmful when exposed
  • MIC can become immune to the chemicals overtime

Pipe Coatings

Pipe coatings are specifically designed to only work as an option for new construction. 

Routine Maintenance

Checking in and doing sprinkler inspections and water analysis is another prevention method that should be adapted. There is Annual Single Bottle MIC testing that has MIC and mineral analysis. Another option is the 5 year, 4 bottle MIC testing and water analysis.

Air relief valves

Air relief valves are doable for most sprinkler systems. Because air travels upward these valves are installed at the highest points of the sprinkler system where they automatically release small amounts of air from the system.

Auto-Air relief valves are the most common solution to prevent MIC. There are multiple reasons they’re the crowd favorite: 

  • Safe
  • Cost-Effective
  • Reliable
  • Venting 

Auto-Air Relief valves are reliable because air travels at the top of pipelines and rises in water, which helps maintain proper water pressure and consistent flow. 

Automatic venting is a process that happens while the sprinkler system is being filled, where the air travels up and gets trapped. VFS has all of the knowledge and expertise to prolong the life cycle of your sprinkler system. 

We’re Here to Help!

This all sounds scary, and not as fun as dropping the mic after karaoke. 

But remember, that we’re here to help!

At VFS Fire & Security Services, we have over 20 years of experience protecting what matters: people, property, and businesses. We recognize that fire sprinkler corrosion is still a problem many property owners and building managers don’t suspect until it’s too late!

So, get your head start! At VFS, we’re here to help you develop and implement an effective strategy for all of your industrial fire protection needs. Keep your systems in tip-top shape and call us today to see what we can do for you!

deluge sprinkler system fire protection tubes

By Becca Jones

Deluge vs. Pre Action Sprinkler Systems

April Showers Bring May Flowers- and also Building Protection

As they say, April showers bring May flowers, we just hope those showers stay on the outside of your building. However, if you happen to need your indoor showers (sprinkler systems and fire suppression systems) it’s best to understand what systems serve your specific building’s needs. Deluge vs. Pre Action Sprinkler Systems—what’s the difference? —–When it comes to fire protection for your building there are many options to consider, and it’s important to understand what these options may entail. 

Deluge Systems 

What is a Deluge system?

Deluge suppression systems are typically used in special hazard installations when water must be applied to an entire area for fire protection. These systems are considered a ‘dry fire protection system’ as the piping for the system is empty and at an atmospheric pressure with the sprinkler heads all open. When heat or fire is detected by the system, the deluge valve releases the water, dry chemicals, inert gases, or foam. 

The type of agent used in the systems is dependent on the hazard type and location of the fire protection system. Once filled, it releases from all sprinkler heads simultaneously, which helps to blanket the entire area, which, in turn, controls the fire. 

These systems are typically used for facilities where an entire area needs to be protected immediately, rather than by a zone or specific location of the source of the heat or fire. Typical facilities that utilize deluge suppression systems are airport hangars, chemical plants, processing plants, and data storage centers. These systems are especially useful when you need to quickly flood an area to prevent a fire from expanding. 

What are the types of deluge systems?

There are a few different types of deluge systems. These systems can be electronically operated, others are pneumatic. The electronically operated systems work when an alarm is set off via a detector, pull station, or another alarm system. Once the alarm is activated, it will energize the solenoid valve, which releases the prime water, or other agents, off the top of the valve, which allows the deluge valve to trip and deliver the agent to the hazard. 

Pre-Action Sprinkler Systems

What is a pre-action sprinkler system?

Pre-action sprinkler systems, on the other hand, are used to protect areas where water damage from damaged sprinklers or piping needs to be avoided. These are a middle ground between dry and wet fire protection systems. 

The major difference between a deluge suppression system and a pre-action system is that pre-action systems are filled with compressed air. The sprinkler heads remain closed until needed, and a pre-action valve holds back the water. It is a hybrid dry/wet system as it is a dry system until it is activated at which point it becomes a wet system. 

Pre-action fire sprinkler systems require two steps to discharge the agent. When the system first detects heat or fire the pre-action valve opens. Next, the pipes are flooded with water, dry chemicals, inert gases, or foam. After it’s filled, the specific sprinkler head must detect heat or fire to open. Then, the system will work to extinguish the fire in the immediate area.

Unlike deluge systems, these systems only cover an area that detects heat or fire. Coverage expands as more sprinkler heads detect heat/fire.

Why would you choose a pre-action sprinkler system?

One of the best reasons to incorporate pre-action sprinkler systems into your building is because sprinkler heads may be falsely triggered. When these sprinkler heads accidentally activate, there may sometimes be costly, irreversible property and water damage to your building. Because pre-action fire sprinkler systems require two-part discharge, they provide an elevated level of protection from accidental discharges. 

Another reason to utilize pre-action fire sprinkler systems is the ability of the pressurized air or nitrogen to detect leaks in the system. This allows you to ensure your system is functioning properly when you need it most. 

What other sprinkler systems should I consider?

There are a few other fire sprinkler systems to consider as you work to ensure your building remains protected. 

Wet Pipe Sprinkler Systems

These systems are the most popular sprinkler systems. They are extremely effective, low-cost, and low-maintenance. This system’s pipes remain filled with water. Once triggered by the heat-source, water flows through the activated sprinkler to the source of the fire. These systems are extremely quick to react to potential fires, however they are at risk of freezing in cold environments. 

Dry Pipe Sprinkler Systems

In freezing climates, dry pipe sprinkler systems are a better choice than wet pipe systems. These systems do not carry water in the piping until they are activated. 

Instead, these pipes are filled with pressurized air and nitrogen. When the system is activated, the dry pipe valve opens and water flows in when the sprinkler head is triggered. 

The disadvantage of these systems is that their response time is delayed. Another potential downfall to these systems is the required maintenance. Sprinkler corrosion is more prevalent in these systems, as the compressed air and oxygen create an enticing environment for corrosion. 

Single Interlock

These systems require a single, preceding fire detection event. This event is typically an activation of heat or smoke detectors. When the event occurs, the pre-action valve allows water to enter the piping system. With these systems, if a sprinkler head activates before this, it will sound a trouble alarm. However, no water will be discharged. 

Double Interlock

Double interlock pre-action systems provide an added layer of protection. These systems require a preceding fire detection to occur in conjunction with an automatic sprinkler activation, prior to water releasing into the pipes. One alarm activation will not be enough to discharge these sprinkler systems. 

At VFS Fire & Security Services we understand that your unique building needs unique fire protection systems. Our team is equipped to ensure you receive the fire protection you need to keep your building and your people safe from harm.

 

sprinkler systems
How Sprinkler Systems Can Save Your Building
Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion
MIC Prevention (not the kind you drop after karaoke)
deluge sprinkler system fire protection tubes
Deluge vs. Pre Action Sprinkler Systems