dethemedetheme
sprinkler systems

By Jackie Berens

How Sprinkler Systems Can Save Your Building

Sprinkler systems don’t just protect your building from potential fires, but from alien invasions too!

I think we all agree, it’s best to be prepared for anything. We’ve seen quite a few once-in-a-lifetime events in the last few months, proving that anything can really happen. We’ve seen footage of UFOs, a Firenado, simultaneous hurricanes, and, oh yes, a global pandemic this year. So how outrageous could an alien invasion be?

As we’ve seen in Aliens 3, the best way to defeat aliens is by using your building’s sprinkler system. Aside from protecting you from an alien invasion, why do commercial buildings require sprinkler systems?

The reason you need a fire sprinkler system

Fire sprinkler systems assist all your fire safety protocols in fighting potential fires and protecting your building’s assets, people, and contents. These systems are an active measure to protect against fires and prevent lives and property damage. They help to limit the fire’s spread and give firefighters ample time to save your building.

Fire sprinklers detect heat from a fire source and trigger the sprinkler head to release water in specific locations. Their purpose is to extinguish the fire or slow it down before the firefighters arrive.

How do I know if a fire sprinkler system is required for my building?

Most commercial buildings require a sprinkler system to be installed, especially in new construction, remodels, and renovations. There are a few sprinkler systems requirements in commercial buildings, the International Building code states the following: 

  1. Sprinkler systems allow builders to increase the footprint of the building. 

Adding sprinkler systems throughout your building allows for a larger building footprint and a higher building height. At VFS, our teams help to plan and budget for new construction sites and assist your team from the planning stages all the way through to completion. Our in-house Design/Build departments produce the highest quality and most accurate results to ensure the safety of your building.

  1. Different occupancies and uses require specific systems.

Certain commercial buildings use group or occupancy-use to determine how the sprinkler systems will be implemented throughout the building. All residential buildings require occupancy load determinants, while other commercial buildings typically use fire areas to determine sprinkler systems management.

  1. Special hazards require sprinkler systems. 

Special hazards environments require the most reliable and advanced fire suppression systems on the market. At VFS we provide not only the systems but the specialized knowledge and certified and trained technicians who install, service, and inspect special hazards fire protection systems including, deluge, foam-based, water mist, dry chemical, and clean agent systems, including FM-200 and carbon dioxide. Special hazard safety begins with the professional integration of the specific fire protection systems required within the environment.

What type of commercial fire sprinkler systems do you need?

Wet Pipe Commercial Sprinkler Systems

Wet pipe commercial sprinkler systems are made up of piping that fills with water when under pressure. These pipes remain filled with water until a fire triggers the sprinkler head to turn on. These are the most frequently used sprinkler systems, as they are extremely simple to use and reliable when you need them most. These systems are also cost-effective in both installation and maintenance. One of the major issues with these sprinkler systems is leaks can occur when temperatures go below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Pre-Action Commercial Sprinkler Systems

In certain commercial buildings, some instances may cause sprinkler systems to discharge accidentally. Pre-action sprinkler systems are designed with a valve to hold water back until certain events have taken place that will then trigger water to flow within the pipes and extinguish the fire. There are two types of pre-action systems, single interlock, and double interlock. These systems require certain events to happen in order to trigger water to flow. Let’s talk about them! 


Single Interlock 

Single interlock pre-action systems operate in a similar manner as the dry pipe system. This type of system requires a singular event to occur before water is released into the system; fire detection from a heat or smoke detector that will trigger the pre-action valve to open.

Each sprinkler head individually opens, to ensure the sprinkler head doesn’t turn on preemptively. These systems are uniquely effective for spaces that contain sensitive equipment or costly materials. However, these systems are complex in design, which therefore makes them higher in installation price and in maintenance costs.

Double Interlock 

As you could probably guess the double interlock pre-action system requires two events to occur before releasing water in the system; fire detection from a heat or smoke detector and automatic sprinkler operation. One of the above actions occurs the pre-action valve operates allowing water into the system piping. These actions introduce an extra layer of security from accidental discharge where unintended activation can be damaging to sensitive environments. 

Foam Water Commercial Sprinkler System

Typically sprinkler systems utilize water to extinguish fires. However, for some fires, water will actually make it worse. Foam water fire sprinkler systems mix water with foam concentrate mix that works to put out the fire. The fire started by gas or alcohol needs a foam solvent to extinguish it as quickly and as safely as possible. The foam is used to stifle the flames and eliminate the opportunity for a re-flash. 

Dry Pipe Commercial Sprinkler Systems

These sprinkler systems were designed to mitigate the leaking issue that comes with wet pipe sprinkler systems. Rather than pressurized water remaining in the entire sprinkler system, these systems are only filled with air or nitrogen indirect, non-heated piping. These systems are designed for buildings that reside in freezing temperatures. Because the water doesn’t reside in the piping system from the start, these sprinkler systems have a delay of up to 60 seconds until the water is discharged. 

Deluge Sprinkler Systems

Deluge fire sprinklers are used in high hazard environments such as power plants, aircraft hangars, and chemical storage facilities where significant amounts of water are needed to cool and control the development of a fire. They are connected to a water supply through a deluge valve while the sprinkler heads remain open which releases water to all open sprinkler heads simultaneously. These systems are incredibly effective in high-hazard environments because they release water or another suppressing agent to all open sprinkler heads simultaneously.

At VFS Fire & Security Services we don’t stop at the basics, we apply our full book of expertise to the systems that need them and follow the specific requirements depending on the particular authority having jurisdiction. Every environment is unique and has its own set of specific requirements and the experts at VFS will help get your business up to code every step of the way.

You need to be prepared for whatever comes your way — including alien invasions! At VFS, we offer preventative and inspection maintenance to ensure your systems are running effectively and efficiently. 

Your business needs to be kept safe, we understand what it takes to make that happen.  

 

What To Include in Your Fire Safety Training: A Complete Guide

By Jackie Berens

What To Include in Your Fire Safety Training: A Complete Guide

Educating your employees on proper fire safety protocols is essential to ensure their workplace safety. In order to keep them safe from harm, they need to know what steps to take in the event of a fire — and no, ‘fricken large ones’ is not correct. In an effort to help guide your fire safety training endeavors, we’ve put together a few tips to improve your employees’ education surrounding building fire safety.

Start with the necessary information.

We think it’s safe to say that most employees do not want to sit through a 3-hour long fire and life safety training. To start, ensure you’re touching on all the ‘need to know’ topics of fire safety. As you dive deeper into fire safety training, you can go over additional topics that may not be as urgent. Urgent topics to review and discuss should include:

  • Types of fires that occur in the workplace
  • How to extinguish the different types of fires that may occur
  • Major causes of fire accidents in the workplace
  • The exits available to employees in case of emergency

Other information regarding fire safety can be included as additional resources. 

First, it’s important to ensure your fire and life safety training is compatible with various devices. Giving employees access to the training on the device of their choice will ensure they complete the training without the headache of trying to navigate a different device! 

Another way to ensure employees remain engaged in the content you’re providing is to use various types of content. Utilizing text, images, and audio helps communicate with all employees in a way that keeps them engaged in the content. 

Implement activity-based learning 

Combining your assessments with activities helps reinforce the content your employees are learning. For example, you can offer simulations or other interactive assessments that make the learning feel more casual while they learn how to operate a fire extinguisher. 

Make sure your employees know the various hazards in your workplace. 

Cooking Equipment

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) claims that the main cause of fires in office buildings is cooking equipment. Office and commercial buildings typically have cooking equipment. Whether there is a mass amount of equipment or one small kitchen for employees, there are safety measures that should be taken. A few of these safety measures include:

Clean Grease Often 

The office kitchen isn’t known for being the cleanest place to cook food, and grease build-up will cause fires to spread quickly.

Ensure all equipment is maintained regularly 

Old equipment increases fire risk and puts employees and the building property at risk. There are specific commercial kitchen requirements that may apply to an in-office kitchen. The precautions with gas-fired appliances include that they must be installed by professionals, oil with gasoline is not allowed, and only specific locations within the building can contain gas-fired appliances. 

Maintain Fire Suppression Systems

Suppression systems are essential in your building. They can save your small kitchen fire from spreading to the rest of your building and putting your employees at risk. Maintaining these suppression systems is essential to the safety of your building. 

Electricals

Electrical fires are common and complex and preventing them can be tricky. Some of the common precautions that should be performed routinely are checking for corroded wiring, keeping a clear space around electrical units, and preventing a circuit overload. The same precautions should be taken with heating equipment. 

Liquid Flammables

Liquid flammables are dangerous and require special precautions. Fires are multifaceted, and stopping the flames can still fail to extinguish the hazard fully. Liquid flammables can expand into the air, which is almost impossible to contain. 

Fire protection products like foam agents can dispel flammable vapors to portable equipment including fire hoses and dry chemical agents. 

Cleaning chemicals are flammable, and should always be stored in an airtight container. The traditional plastic containers that cleaning supplies come in are not enough to protect against hot flames. Buying containers that are made of glass or metal can help. 

COVID-19 has significantly increased the amount of alcohol-based hand sanitizer stored in buildings. If a company purchases gallons of hand sanitizer, they can split up the bulk into smaller amounts of flammable liquids. 

The National Fire Protection Association says the acceptable amount in each container is, “1.2 liters for dispensers in rooms, corridors, and areas open to corridors,” and 18 oz for aerosols. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention claims that the likelihood that hand sanitizer combusts is low, but not impossible. The best way to prevent this is to separate the liquid into smaller containers and store them at a low room temperature. 

Smoking Areas

Depending on the type of work, a non-smoking environment can prevent fatal fires. Fire danger increases in the presence of welding and sparks. The flammable air vapor that can surround liquid flammables will combust if met with a spark from machines of smoke. This is true for all forms of smoking including vaping. 

At VFS, your building’s safety is our top priority. With over 25 years of experience, our fire and life safety experts ensure your building remains safe from harm. The equipment we install, inspect, and maintain is only one component of your fire and life safety initiatives. The other aspect includes employee training. Your employees need education on what to do in case of an emergency. 

Marine Fire Safety Checklist

By Becca Jones

Your Marine Fire Safety Checklist

You wouldn’t think fire could stand a chance when surrounded by a body of water—but it does. Boom! It feels like in every action movie ever created, a boat explodes in a bay or on the ocean. Although dramatized, there’s a reality to it. Directors paint the danger picture perfectly!

At VFS Fire & Security Services, we are the drivers of innovation within the fire protection industry, including specialization in marine fire safety. Although most fires seem to look the same in movies, there are a variety of different types of fires that may occur on your vessel. We’re in the business of educating people and keeping them safe when it comes to fire protection, which is why a marine fire safety checklist is necessary for any marine-related organization.

Your Marine Fire Safety Checklist

There is a multitude of boxes to check when it comes to keeping your maritime operations safe and fire-free. We’re providing a comprehensive list to get you thinking about the safety of your marine operations.

Certificates and Documents

There is a long list of certificates and documents that must be carried on board at all times. This list varies based on region, whether or not your vessel carries passengers, and vessel type. 

This list might include a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment or Passenger Ship Safety Certificate, all servicing records including proof of fire extinguisher servicing and pressure tests, a damage control manual, any records of testing, drills, and maintenance, a variety of training manuals, the list goes on! For more specific information on staying up to code and what you need to keep on board, contact our VFS team!

Fire Safety Equipment

There are hundreds of safety measures in place to prevent fire aboard your vessel, including a handful of safety equipment that must be carried and tests that must be performed. Let’s shoot for smooth sailing, please! 

  • Sprinkler systems: Valves, alarms, pumps, and pressure gauges must be tested and properly working with pipework in fair condition
  • Ventilators and fire dampers: Must be clean and free of debris with flaps in fair condition
  • Proper fire detection and fire alarm systems that provide the necessary  coverage and protection of assets on board
  • Properly installed extinguishing systems
  • Personal equipment, including fire fighting protective wear, self-contained breathing apparatuses (SCBAs), and emergency escape breathing devices (EEBDs)
  • Properly functioning gas and CO2 systems

Additionally, pathways must be always free of obstruction and clearly marked in the event of an emergency evacuation. Doors must always only be held open by approved methods.

Engine Room Maintenance

Did you know that approximately 90% of marine fires start in the engine room? This considered, don’t underestimate the importance of routinely checking your engine room’s fire pumps, emergency shutdowns and valves, high-pressure fuel lines, and main zones for proper functionality and cleanliness.

Deck Maintenance and Crew Readiness

In case of an emergency, your crew should be familiar with the use of these fire protection systems and able to abandon ship if necessary. Fire drills should be performed routinely. Preparation is key for tip-top marine fire safety. As for deck safety, structures in place might include a variety of paint lockers, ventilators, and international shore connections.

Emergency Equipment

Fingers crossed, this equipment doesn’t need to be used! Your emergency equipment, including emergency generators, batteries, pumps, and tankers, however, must be properly maintained, inspected, and ready to be used at any moment.

Here to Help!

While you’re on the water, whether it be for pleasure or work, marine fire safety and preparation cannot be overlooked. Having the right fire safety equipment and performing the right maintenance and routine inspections may be the difference between life and death.

Our VFS team is prepared to get your vessel in tip-top shape with the right marine fire safety equipment. In fact, the VFS Houston Team has been continuing to grow our marine department and has recently acquired four new Tug & Barge Companies—bringing their annual total of vessels to perform fire safety inspections and testing to approximately 375.

With VFS by your side, you’ll be the fire protection talk of the town! Get in touch today to see what we can do for you.

Fire Safety Audits for your Industrial Property

By Becca Jones

Fire Safety Inspections for your Facilities: Your Complete Guide

Your palms are sweating, you’re biting your nails, what’s that? It’s time for your building’s routine fire safety inspection! Geez, it’s like you’re taking an exam back in high school! But it doesn’t have to be such a stress.

At VFS Fire & Security Services, we are experts in fire protection no matter what environment your facility is housed. Whether your fire inspection is for a health care center, school, oil and gas facility, or even a vessel, we’ve got you covered. But first, let’s talk about fire safety inspections, why they’re important, and what to expect during yours.

What is a Fire Safety Inspection?

A fire safety inspection is a necessary examination of a building or structure and its relevant fire safety documents. A fire safety inspection measures how well your building—whether it be a business, school, health care center, and so on—is managed in regards to fire safety. Legally, buildings must comply with a set of building codes and ordinances to keep their occupants safe. A fire safety inspection ensures you are doing so and calculates the potential risk factor in a given facility. 

Why?

Fire can be an extremely detrimental force not only to people but also to a business or organization. Whether small or large, the damage from fire to a building is often irrevocable without a large financial cost.

Fire safety inspections are often pre-arranged and are preventive at heart. They help building owners and managers to identify potential fire hazards and to make the necessary changes. For those who choose not to comply with fire safety inspections and guidelines, the punishment is substantial.

Although this routine inspection might feel like a hassle in your tight schedule, there’s no such thing as being too safe.

What to Expect

Each fire safety inspection will vary, of course, depending on your organization and building. In all inspections, however, you will be asked to provide all relevant fire safety documents. This might include:

  • Evacuation Protocol
  • Fire Risk Assessment
  • Fire Drill and Staff Fire Training Records
  • Proof that Preventative Fire Systems have been tested (fire detection, alarms, sprinklers, fire extinguishers, emergency lighting, ventilation, firefighting equipment, electrical wiring, and so on)
  • List of potentially dangerous substances in building or on grounds
  • Fire Safety Maintenance Checklist

During your fire safety inspection, you can anticipate a walk-through inspection with your examiner, and for said examiner to speak with others on the premise to validate the fire safety information that you’ve provided.

Here, we’ve compiled a brief summary of what to expect within different facilities: health care, education, oil and gas, and marine.

Health Care

Fire safety inspections for health care are especially important considering a large number of people in health care facilities at any given time. This considered you should be familiar with the inspection processes—yay! Here’s a rundown of what you can expect:

During your visual inspection, the examiner will take occupancy limits and clear exit paths into special account. That means no unruly electrical wiring and definitely no using the sprinkler heads as coat racks! Hazardous materials, chemicals, and extinguishers are to be stored properly and in correct locations.

Considering the number of patients in a building, your examiner will pay special attention to your evacuation plan, policies, and maps posted. Additionally, your examiner will need proof of your fire drills, which are to be documented and executed annually if not quarterly in your building.

Lastly, the inspection will cover disaster protocols and preparation. This includes effective parking measures (i.e. can make clear, unobstructed use of fire hydrants and lanes) and questioning employees about the health care center’s fire safety measures. To ace your inspection, ensure all employees are undergoing periodic fire training and drills.

Education

There’s nothing scarier than the thought of our children being unsafe! Fire safety is extremely important in schools, especially considering the wide variety of ages and abilities in a school. Requirements for educational fire protection, in most states, are based on NFPA codes. Here are some pointers of what to expect in an educational fire safety inspection:

Educational facilities hold strict requirements on space. According to the NFPA, your examiner will ensure that there are at least 20 square feet per person. Space requirements influence how and where students can be in a building and are important in considering where certain aged children need to be in regard to floors.

Schools additionally are required to have proper fire detection systems, fire sprinkler systems, and extinguishers. Routine fire drills are a regular and necessary part of educational fire safety, and all schools must have an approved emergency action plan (EAP).

And of course, examiners pay special attention to exits, flammability and amount of decor and artwork, flammable materials, and areas of assembly.

Oil and Gas

Considering the high number of petrochemicals at an oil and gas facility—not to mention their high level of combustion—the biggest danger here is fire. Oil and gas facilities are extremely high risk, so here are some tips to successfully prepare for your fire safety adult:

We already know that properly working fire detection systems and alarms are a legal essential but have you considered installing a mass notification system? This way, a message or call can be sent out to your employees, notifying them of a potential fire or dangerous system.

Similarly, installing a gas monitoring system is a great step. Gases are often, at oil and gas facilities, highly flammable and the reason for combustion. A gas monitoring system can work to reduce fire by tracking dangerous gas levels.

During your fire safety inspection, an examiner will be looking to ensure not only that your facility goes through routine inspections and drills but also that your fire protection systems offer sufficient coverage and protection from the combustibles and chemicals that are stored within your facility. A fire brings enough chaos of its own so it is essential that your employees are informed on what to do in case of an emergency.

Additionally, implementing on-site emergency equipment is a wise choice, as often, emergency services get there after the damage has already been done. If, however, you make this choice, ensure that your employees have been properly trained on how and when to use said equipment.

Marine

We know, we can’t believe it either… fire on water! But it’s more common than you’d think. There are a lot of boxes to be checked when it comes to keeping your maritime operations safe. Let’s get you thinking about the current safety of your marine operations with a checklist.

For starters, there is a long, varying list of certificates and documents that are to be carried on board at all times. This might include a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment or Passenger Ship Safety Certificate, servicing records including proof of fire extinguisher servicing and pressure tests, a damage control manual, records of testing, drills, and maintenance, and a variety of training manuals.

Of course, let’s not forget safety equipment that must be carried and inspected during your inspection.

  • Sprinkler Systems
  • Ventilators and Fire Dampers
  • Proper fire detection and fire alarms
  • Properly installed extinguishing systems
  • Personal Equipment, including fire fighting protective wear, SCBAs (self-contained breathing apparatus), and EEBDs (emergency escape breathing devices)
  • Properly functioning gas and CO2 systems

Additionally, pathways must be always free of obstruction and clearly marked in the case of evacuation. Doors must always only be held open by approved methods.

Approximately 90% of marine fires start in the engine room, so be sure that this will be a big check zone during your inspection, including your engine room’s fire pumps, emergency shutdowns and valves, high-pressure fuel lines, and main zones

Lastly, ensure your crew is familiar with the use of these fire protection systems and able to abandon ship if necessary. Fire drills should be routinely performed. Preparation is key for tip-top marine fire safety! As for deck safety, structures in place might include a variety of paint lockers, ventilators, and international shore connections.

Emergency equipment, including emergency generators, batteries, pumps, and tankers, however, must be properly maintained, inspected, and ready to be used at any given moment. Now go ace that inspection!

What Happens Next?

Well, this depends on how well your inspection went and how your structure scored! With VFS by your side, we promise you’ll get a gold star!

You should receive a report after your inspection is conducted, which contains any findings from your walk-through and action steps for you to take. These action steps will address any ways in which your building might be deemed unsafe and identify a solution. Typically, minor breaches in fire safety law are informal and the examiner will set a deadline as to when the issue needs to be fixed. However, there can be more serious deficiencies that could result in fines or possibly disruptions to your facility. At VFS Fire & Security Services, we know that there is nothing more important than keeping people safe—and we have the expertise and the tools to do so. Don’t get caught up in a fine, serving time in prison, or worst of all, putting individuals in danger. Contact us today to see how we can help make your fire safety inspections a breeze!

Fire Protection for Education Buildings

By Becca Jones

Fire Protection for Education Buildings

While the kids are away the fire protection must stay

It’s SPRING BREAK! Woohooo! But before you go off to the beaches, ensure your building remains protected. What do you know about fire protection for education buildings? Though the kids may be away, the fire protection must stay.

Educational facilities have a few specific regulations when it comes to fire protection since so many lives need to be protected at all times. What fire protection systems do you need to be aware of?

Educational facilities’ minimum fire protection and life safety requirements are outlined in NFPA 101: Life Safety Code. In this code, educational occupancies are defined as “any building used for educational purposes through the twelfth grade by six or more persons for four or more hours per day or more than 12 hours per week.” This is expanded to include preschools and kindergartens that meet these requirements:

  • The purpose is primarily educational, even though the children who attend such schools are of preschool age.
  • The children are all 24 months of age or older.

What requirements are included for educational facilities?

Space Requirements

Determining your code requirements for your specific facility starts with the capacity of your building. According to NFPA 101, the capacity of a building is assessed by calculating the occupant load of the space, which means how large the area needs to be based on the total number of people in the school. To remain compliant with the occupant load required, you need to plan for at least 20 square feet per person. 

This code provides information on where and how students can be located throughout your building. Younger children must be located closer to the ground floor in order to make evacuation easier and more efficient. Specifically, classrooms for preschool, kindergarten, and first-grade must be on the level of exit discharge. Classrooms for second-grade can be located no more than one floor above the level of exit discharge.

What is the level of exit discharge?

The level of exit discharge is defined as “the story that is either the lowest story from which not less than 50% of the required number of exits and not less than 50 % of the required egress capacity from such a story discharge directly outside at the finished ground level; or where no story meets the conditions of item (1), the story that is provided with one or more exits that discharge directly to the outside to the finished ground level via the smallest elevation change.”

Finally, for education facilities, flexible and open floor plans that have more than 300 students per room, require at least 2 means of egress. They must open to separate atmospheres. It’s important that your local fire marshal or authority with jurisdiction signs off on these floor plans and configurations. 

Operations and Planning

Education facilities are required to have an emergency action plan in place to ensure the inhabitants of the building remain safe from harm. The emergency action plan should illustrate a plan for various emergency situations. As you work to prep this plan, ensure you consider common emergencies, as well as area-related emergencies. On a basic level, without area-specific emergencies in mind, you should include the following in your action plan:

  • A procedure for reporting emergencies
  • Evacuation, relocation, and shelter-in-place procedures
  • Elevator use details
  • Occupant and staff response information
  • The design and conduct of fire drills
  • The various fire protection systems and their coverage areas
  • Other information required by local jurisdiction and fire authority

It’s important that you define which administrators will be responsible for the emergency action plan creation process and which positions will be responsible for managing it in the event of an emergency. Educational facilities should conduct and document fire and emergency egress drills at least once per month when school is in session. In these drills, all building occupants must participate and all alarms must be activated.

Staff members should inspect all exit areas, and ensure all stairwells, doors, and exit passageways are clear, unobstructed, and in proper working condition. Ensure all these inspections are documented. 

For schools, there are very specific requirements when it comes to what can go on the walls. Fire code only allows for 20% of a wall area to be covered with art and paper products, as they are extremely flammable. If fire sprinklers are installed throughout the school, that coverage can be increased to 50% of the wall area.

Fire Safety Equipment

Ensure you have proper fire safety equipment in place to keep your building and your faculty, staff, and students safe from harm. Let’s dive into what equipment is essential to the safety of your building and your people. 

Fire alarm systems

Educational facilities typically require fire alarm systems. Small facilities that are no larger than 1,000 square feet, with a single classroom, and located further than 30 feet from another building can be without fire alarms. For example, this includes mobile or portable buildings that are utilized as classrooms and spaced 30 feet from the school and other mobile classrooms.

There are multiple exceptions and specifications depending on specific facility needs that may affect your fire alarm system implementation. This may include the elimination of manual alarm pull stations or the addition of a mass notification or emergency alarm communication system. In order to understand your specific building needs, contact your authority having jurisdiction or a fire safety expert, like our team at VFS!

Fire Sprinkler Systems

A building greater than 1.000 square feet with multiple rooms requires automatic fire sprinkler systems. Buildings under 1,000 square feet and those with single rooms do not require fire sprinklers. All kitchens and cooking appliances should be protected with special hood and fire suppression systems. 

Fire extinguishers

Lastly, education facilities require fire extinguishers to be installed throughout the building. The specific placement and number of extinguishers are based on the size and the layout of a building. Extinguishers should be installed, tested, maintained, and selected following NFPA 10: Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers. 

Our team at VFS Fire & Security Services is equipped to help with your unique fire safety needs. We firmly believe in building long-lasting relationships with our clients. From planning to implementation to testing and maintenance, our services are always tailored to meet our clients’ specific needs. 

1 2 3 4
sprinkler systems
How Sprinkler Systems Can Save Your Building
What To Include in Your Fire Safety Training: A Complete Guide
What To Include in Your Fire Safety Training: A Complete Guide
Marine Fire Safety Checklist
Your Marine Fire Safety Checklist
Fire Safety Audits for your Industrial Property
Fire Safety Inspections for your Facilities: Your Complete Guide
Fire Protection for Education Buildings
Fire Protection for Education Buildings